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By Justin Lagat 
The men's steeple was one of my most anticipated races. It lived up to the hype. Yes, I hoped for Evan Jager to win the gold (as he did), but he battled on, taking bronze, getting first steeple medal for an American male in the World Championships.
 
Conseslus Kipruto single-handedly prevents a potential dethronement of Kenyans in the men's 3000m steeplechase.
 
Just like the East African runners had been seen to be plotting on how to dethrone Mo Farah in the men's 10,000m race for a while now, the rest of the world seem to have as well been, for even a longer time, plotting to beat the Kenyans in their most successful race at the world and Olympic championships; the men's 3000m.
 
With a world leading time by Evan Jager of the US a few weeks to the championships and Morroco's Soufiane El Bakkali having also shown great form by winning two IAAF Diamond League races ahead of the championships, many were rightfully predicting the first win by a non-Kenyan at the world championships since 1987, except if one wants to count out Kenyan-born Saif Shaheen who won the titles in 2003 and 2005 as a non-Kenyan.
Published in Track & Field
Updated 9.15 PM, August 17, 2016. Ezekial Kemboi has been DQed over rule 163.3.
 
BY LARRY EDER—In a brilliant and gutty run, Evan Jager took over the steeple final at three minutes and twenty seconds into the race, broke the race open, stayed calm and collected and caught Ezekial Kemboi on the final straight, to bring the US a silver medal, the highest men's US finish since 1952 and the first men's steeple medal since 1984! Conseslus Kipruto won the steeplechase, with Ezekial Kemboi, Olympic champion from 2004 and 2012, taking the bronze.
 
This race was the work of a team. Under the thoughtful eyes of Coaches Jerry Schumacher and Pascal Dobert, the Bowerman AC team were prepared. Schumacher and Dobert honed the skills of Jager over the barriers and the flats.
Published in Track & Field