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Sunday, 12 November 2017 22:29

SHALANE SUCCESS SHARED

By Carolyn Mather

 

Today Shalane Flanagan shared her success with 50,700 finishers and over 600 million viewers across the world who watched her race at the TCS New York City Marathon.A new footnote is that three American women went under 2:30 for the first time in race history.The finishers hailed from 125 nations and all 50 states.Race director, Peter Ciaccia stated that "New York was the center of the running world all weekend and held the greatest marathon in the world".Surely that echoed Shalane's feelings as she was still on an adrenaline high this morning having not slept and arising at 5:30am to appear on Good Morning America and with Kelly Ripa. She found herself eating pizza at 3:30am and reliving her dream come true.

 

I suspect she truly made her dream a reality for late finishers as she and Meb and a few other elites returned to the finish line late last evening to present medals to finishers. What an incredible treat that must have been for some unsuspecting but tired and elated runners.

 

 While having the winners present checks to their chosen charities this morning, the New York Roan Runners also honored Noah and Raine the first finishers in the kids race and had them present a check to Save the Children. Giving back is a way the NYRR awards $10,000 checks to the winners to donate to their favorite charity.

 

And although Meb was the story of the week, Shalane is the story of the moment.She has worked for this victory nearly all of her life. Having runners as parents set a model for her to pursue. She feels her parents and athletics have given her a never give up attitude and a strong work ethic.She stated that this job is "an all encompassing lifestyle that is 24/7".Right now she wants to live in the present moment and savor this victory and all of it's ramifications.She is feeling extreme joy,gratitude and validation. She views her victory as "the culmination of a lifetime of work".In 2010 she was second here and she quipped " it has taken seven years to move up one place".She called this race "my superbowl".

Published in Athletes
By Carolyn Mather
 
On a damp and chilly morning in New York City Shalane Flanagan held true to her promise to win the TCS New York City Marathon and added a crown jewel to her massive resume of American records and an Olymmpic silver medal. Returning to the marathon after her last marathon in August 2016 at the Olympic Marathon in Rio de Janeiro, she has suffered through a broken back and basically a year out of competition missing the world championship 10,000 track team by one place.
 
Yet today brought a redemption and a dream finally realized as she took the TCS New York City Marathon by storm and became the first female winner in forty years. Throughout the week she stayed firm in her belief that it was her time. Although the dominant,according to Shalane "alpha female" in the field was three time winner Mary Keitany, Shalane promised she would cover every move Mary or anyone else made to get that long awaited major marathon major title. Although that appeared somewhat of a potential suicide mission,her coach Jerry Schumacher said there was no specific plan except to do exactly that. 
 
Fortunately on this morning in the Big Apple, an Italian triathlete Sara Dossenna took the early lead after a 6:43 first mile and 12:41 at two miles. A fairly pedestrian 19:15 for 5K and 36:55 10K left a large pack of nineteen together, jostling for their special fluid bottles and waiting for the racing to begin. A pack of nine remained at 25K (1:30:08)and a few were seconds behind.They were still on a 2:32 pace which would not put undue strain on any of these women.
Published in Marathons
By Rich Sands, @sands
(c) 2017 Race Results Weekly, all rights reserved, used with persmission
 
NEW YORK (05-Nov) -- In what she hinted might be the final marathon of her career, Shalane Flanagan became the first American to win the TCS New York City Marathon in 40 years with a commanding surge over the final three miles. The men's race featured a similarly strong finish from Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor, who held off a mad dash from countryman Wilson Kipsang to score his first-ever marathon win.
 
 
CAUTIOUS START FOR THE WOMEN
 
The women's field set off 30 minutes prior to the masses, with an extremely cautious tempo. The pack hit the 5-K in 19:12, barely under 2:42 pace, and at halfway (1:16:18) there were still 15 athletes in contention. Three-time defending champion Mary Keitany of Kenya made periodic attempts to force the pace but the pack continuously regrouped, clicking off splits mostly in the 5:35-5:45 per mile range.
 
It wasn't until the 21st mile, going over the Madison Avenue Bridge crossing from the Bronx into Manhattan, that the race started taking shape. Keitany, Flanagan and Mamitu Daska of Ethiopia pulled away down Fifth Avenue, quickly gapping Kenyan Edna Kiplagat and American Kellyn Taylor.
 
The lead trio ran the 22nd mile in 5:09 before Flanagan started her hard drive to the finish. As they entered Central Park in the 23rd mile, the gap continued to grow and it was apparent that Keitany did not have the spark in her legs that brought her a women's only world record of 2:17:01 in London this past April. Flanagan covered the segment from 35K to 40K in a blistering 15:57 and cruised home waving her fists to the crowd (and letting out an apparent jubilant expletive). She crossed the line in 2:26:53 with tears in her eyes.
 
The last American woman to top the podium in New York was the late Miki Gorman, back in 1977. Flanagan also became the first American woman to win an Abbott World Marathon Majors race since 2006 when Deena Kastor finished first in London.
 
Keitany came across second in 2:27:54, with Daska (2:28:08) holding on for the third podium spot. The U.S. had three more athletes in the Top 10, with Allie Kieffer (2:29:39 PB), Taylor (2:29:56) and Stephanie Bruce (2:31:44) placing 5th, 8th and 10th, respectively. Kieffer's breakthrough performance was a remarkable improvement on her PR 2:44:44, run indoors on a 200-meter track at New York City's Armory in 2016.
Published in Marathons