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BY LARRY EDER
The 2018 Boston Marathon will, like the 1976 Boston Marathon, go down as a historical event. The wind, the rain, the sleet, the constant pounding made for one hellacious marathon. But, in discussions with coaches, athletes and observers, I see five important lessons to learn from this years' Boston marathon.
 
 
1. THE MORE YOU RACE BOSTON, THE MORE YOU LEARN ABOUT THE COURSE.
Desi Linden has run the Boston marathon six times as of April 16, 2018. That experience, that knowledge of how ones' body responds to the course, the downhills, the uphills and the competition. Desi Linden has seen everthing on the Boston course. Over the weekend, Desi noted, " I love the Boston marathon. It is THE marathon. I love the course. The Boston marathon is why I am still racing today." Linden became a student of the Boston marathon. She knew about the races that preceded her. She had lost by two seconds in 2011. Desi Linden knew, in her DNA what writer John Parker called the " Miles of Trial and the Trials of Miles."
Published in Marathons
By Larry Eder
 
Galen Rupp wanted to be "invisible" in the race until after 22 miles. "And in the last four miles, you know, anything can happen."
 
And it did.
 
Between 35 kilometers and 40 kilometers, Galen Rupp took the field apart. The early pace was modest, as the field hit the half marathon in 1:06:11. The men just spent too much time watching each other and not enough trying to break the key players. Galen Rupp purposely did not lead early in the race. His attitude was as if this were a championship event, and for Galen Rupp, winning a World Marathon Major event was, and is a championship event.
 
Lots can go wrong over 26.2 miles. If one prepares with precision, then, one cuts down the number of things that can go wrong. Galen Rupp told us about a 25 mile run where he ran the first 20 at good pace and the final five at 4:30 per mile pace. "That gave me great confidence," noted Galen Rupp in the post race conference.
 
The 35th kilometer was run in 2:50, and the field of ten dropped to four, with Rupp, Lemma, Sambu and Kirui. Then, the race got intense. It was beautiful to watch.
 
As Abel Kirui, two time World champion, defending Chicago Champ, tried to control the race, Galen Rupp felt his opportunity. A 4:31 mile was followed by a 4:30 mile, which had been preceeded by a 4:36 mile. That 5k of 14:25 was the fastest in history on the course.
 
Galen Rupp ran his fastest kilometer, between 40-41 kilometers, with a blistering 2:38, and he ran to his first marathon win!
 
Galen Rupp was the first American male to win the Chicago Marathon since 2002! He has also won his first World Marathon Major in a exciting finish!
 
Now, it's off to the Field Museum for the Rupp family to check out some dinosaur bones.
Published in Marathons
Wednesday, 23 August 2017 20:01

The Finest 10,000m Ever Run

On 4 August, 2017, in the London Olympic Stadium, the 55,00o in said stadium and hundreds of million of viewers watched the finest 10,000 meters ever run.
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
On Saturday morning, I was doing a short piece for BBC Five Live. They had an exceptional interview with Dalilah Muhammed. When asked about Dalilah, I called her the 'Edwin Moses' of women’s 400m hurdling. I have seen Dalilah as exceptional for some time, and her Rio win made me a believer. Her run in Sacramento just added to the respect I have for Dalilah Muhammed.
 
Day four was exceptional. In the women's 400 meter hurdles, six finishers under 54 seconds, with three under 53 seconds!
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
Day Three brought the temperature even more, and a temperature around 100 felt so much nicer than 110. Sam Kendricks used that tepid weather to clear six meters, his first time over that classic pole vault height. Sam was one of the fine performances on Saturday, June 24. Here's some of my other observations.
 
The men's 400 meter was a battle between Fred Kerley and Gil Roberts, who battled down to the finish line, with Fred Kerley continuing his undefeated season, running 44.03. Gil Roberts ran a fine 44.22 and Will London III in third in 44.47. Seven men under 45 seconds showed just how tough it is to make the 400 meter team. Add on to that LaShawn Merritt's wild card, and we have four men in the 400 meters in London.
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
The two 100-meter races on Friday night were very different. Both races, were examples of the quality of American men and women in the sprints. They also show that sprint skills are developed, and that experience wins out, in many cases.
 
On the women's side, Tori Bowie has finally come to believe in herself. Staying focused, Ms. Bowie has tremendous talent over 100 meters, and exceptional skills over 200 meters. In the 100 meters, Torie Bowie had an adequate start, and moved into contention with half of the race, and dominated the last 40 meters, running strong through the finish.
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
The 10,000 meters were the two big finals that kept the fans in the stands late into the evening, as the 10,000 meters were moved back one hour to keep the temperatures under 40 degrees Celcius/100 degrees Fahrenheit. Hotter than the temperatures were the finishes of winners Molly Huddle and Hassan Mead.
 
The 10,000 meters, held on Thursday night, could not have been more different. Very compelling, but, so different. Shalane Flanagan held the lead for 22 of the 25 laps. Molly Huddle moved away over the last three laps, using a strong last lap to cement the title. Molly Huddle ran 73.54, 69.58 and a final 65.03. 
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
You know, there are weekends of track and field and there are Wonder weekends. Last weekend, dear readers, was a wonder weekend. Each day of the US Champs had great moments, but consider the shot put. Consider the sixth round and the last two throws.
 
Joe Kovacs was sitting in second place, with a throw of 21.93 meters. Ryan Crouser had been leading since attempt one, where Ryan had thrown 21.82 meters. In attempt three, Crouser cranked a 22.02 meters, and in round five, threw 22.01 meters. He was looking pretty darn good.
Joe Kovacs had throw 21.93 meters on his fifth attempt.
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder 
For me, the 2017 Boston Marathon, with the heat, humidity and wind, was still one of the finest races in the event’s storied history. Americans had two women and six men in the top ten in each elite race. 30,000 runners battled heat, humidity and wind on April 17, 2017.
Edna KIplagat and Geoffrey Kirui showed that running for the first time on the course does not dampen your chance of running well through the towns around Boston.
 
Here are five things I learned from observing the 2017 Boston Marathon.
 
1. Edna Kiplagat is formidable, at the age of 38. 
When will we learn? Carlos Lopes won the 1984 Olympic marathon at the age of 36. Jack Foster took the 1974 Commonwealth Games silver medal in the marathon at the age of 41. Age is in our minds. Edna Kiplagat trained well, and she sensed the time to break the field, charging uphill between miles 19 and 20, and running 5:22, an astounding mile uphill. Kiplagat won the 2013 World Championships in hot Moscow, so the warm weather in Boston didn’t hurt her.
Published in Marathons