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By Larry Eder
The two 100-meter races on Friday night were very different. Both races, were examples of the quality of American men and women in the sprints. They also show that sprint skills are developed, and that experience wins out, in many cases.
 
On the women's side, Tori Bowie has finally come to believe in herself. Staying focused, Ms. Bowie has tremendous talent over 100 meters, and exceptional skills over 200 meters. In the 100 meters, Torie Bowie had an adequate start, and moved into contention with half of the race, and dominated the last 40 meters, running strong through the finish.
Published in Track & Field

by Dave Hunter

June 22, 2017, Sacramento

 

With all due respect to every other event on the track and in the field, isn't there just something special - almost magical - about the 100 meters?

 

The heritage of the 100 meters - the "Century" as it is often referred to by the old-schoolers - is deeply rooted. Our fascination with speed, running speed, goes way back. It is engrained in our culture. From schoolyard squabbles to see who can run the fastest to the quadrennial Olympic finals in the dash, the 100 meters is the battlefield where the argument is finally settled: Who really is the fastest?

 

There is a certain notoriety that accompanies the "Fastest" title. With apologies to the mile, the 100 meters is probably the best known and most embraced track & field event for the expanded population that extends beyond track & field's hardcore fan base. Jesse Owens, Carl Lewis, Usain Bolt - all household names borne from, among other things, 100 meter success.

Published in Track & Field