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The sixty meters is an unforgiving sprint. You either are on, or you are off.
 
Christian Coleman has been on all season.
 
His 6.37 for the 60 meters woke us up on January 19. A fast time, but again, early in season, and without electronic blocks, a Zero gun and drug testing (it costs money), no record. Maurice Greene's 6.39 from 1998 and 2001 was safe for a bit more time.
 
That time ended on February 17, when Christian ran 6.34 at the USATF Indoor Championships, destroying the World Record and setting a WR with electronic blocks, Zero Gun and drug testing. Coleman had his world record.
 
And then comes the World Indoors....
Published in Track & Field
 
BOSTON (USA, Feb 10): Fourth meet of IAAF World Indoor Tour at Reggie Lewis Center saw men´s 300 m World lead and four meet records. Impressive Brazier, Simpson, O´Hare and Cheserek in distance races. Coleman clocked 6.46 this time in the 60 m. 
 
Event by event review
 
Men
60 m: Coleman won clearly with fast 6.46 (missed MR by 0.01), but was not close to WR this time. Chinese Xie Zhenye 6.54 and third Noah Lyles 6.57 PB.
 
300 m (non Tour event): Trinidad´s Richards 32.10 World lead, Meet record and 7th best ever, also national best for his country. 400 m World leader Taplin beaten 32.50.
 
400 m (non Tour event): Lendore another TTO win over thin field 46.25 as Josephus Lyles false started.
 
800 m: Brazier close to US record but gets 1:45.11 indoor PB, MR and third fastest of the year. German Reuther 1:46.78 2nd as World indoor champ Berian after fast begin fully faded.
 
1500 m (non Tour event): O´Hare after Millrose wins again in 3:37.03 EL+MR and indoor PB, second another Briton Wightman 3:37.43 in his first ever indoor 1.5.
 
3000 m: Cheserek sprinted in last lap in a special way and gets 7:38.74 overall PB, third fastest of 2018 and mainly 24 hours after sub 3:50 mile. Ethiopians beaten, Gebrhiwot 7:41.79 and Gebremeskel 7:42.78. European Indoor champ Mechall who led for 6 minutes 4th in 7:44.31.
 
TJ: Chris Carter as expected 16.67 in a field of three.
 
Women
400 m: Wimbley wins in 51.82 MR over World champ Francis 52.38.
 
800 m (non Tour event): Canadian Westaway front running paid-off with 2:01.22 (overall PB) win over Rogers 2:01.73, Lipsey 2:02.05 and Sharp 2:02.20.
 
1500 m: Seayoum season opener good 4:04.38 but 2nd Praught-Lee Jamaican record 4:04.95 and Tsegay 4:05.91 with South African record for Scott 4:07.25.
 
3000 m (non Tour event): Simpson indoor PB 8:40.31 ahead of F. Tesfay 8:41.08 big PB. Third Briton Twell indoor PB 8:41.94 and fourth steeple World champ Coburn 8:43.57.
 
60mH: Thousands battle Nelvis 7.881 over Manning 7.888. Third Stowers 7.98.
 
HJ: Kinsey of Sweden who is in USA cleared 191 in third and won.
Published in Track & Field
For the next four weeks, Nike is sponsoring a daily homage to the World Indoors by RunBlogRun. From Monday to Friday, we feature athletes from US, UK, Europe, Africa and Asia. On Saturdays and Sundays, we feature a great moment from World Indoor Championship history, again thanks to sponsor, Nike. We hope that you like this series.
 
For Week 5, Day 1, we feature Christian Coleman as our U.S. athlete focusing on Birmingham.
 
Christian Coleman lets his legs do the talking and talking they did on January 19, 2018. At the Clemson University Indoor Complex, Christian Coleman, the London World Championships silver medalist over 100 meters and on the silver medal winning 4x100m team. His London experiences came at the end of a season that included over 30 plus races.
 
At Clemson, Christian showed his fitness with a fine 6.47 in the 60 meter heats. For Coleman, whose PB at 60m was 6.45, this was a big opener and his fastest 60m in the month of January ever.
 
One hour, forty minutes later, in the final, the fans in Clemson were treated to an amazing race. With a fine start and a withering run over the sixty meters, Christian Coleman ran 6.37 for the sixty meters. That time, if ratified, will take .02 off the WR held by 2000 Olympic gold medalist Maurice Greene, who ran 6.39 in March 1998 and March 2001.
 
Within hours, the social media world was full of comparisons of Coleman and Greene, and fans were wondering what Christian's next move will be?
 
What does this say about our friend, Christian Coleman? It tells you that Mr. Coleman is in the shape of his life and that Birmingham could be an exciting series of races!
 
There is this a misconception about world records. World Records, contrary to common thought, are not made to be broken. A world record is the perfect storm of fitness, focus and environment. When a record is broken, many times athletes are not even aware that they are going so fast, jumping so far or throwing so long. And they sure do not want their record to be broken soon. The reason that Coleman is resonating now is that the record he broke, has stood for so long and it was set by such a fine athlete. 
 
Coleman is focused on running fast, and winning Birmingham 2018. A month to go! 
 
For more information on the World Indoors Birmingham in March 2018, visit www.wicbirmingham2018.com .
 
 
Published in Track & Field
By Larry Eder
On Saturday morning, I was doing a short piece for BBC Five Live. They had an exceptional interview with Dalilah Muhammed. When asked about Dalilah, I called her the 'Edwin Moses' of women’s 400m hurdling. I have seen Dalilah as exceptional for some time, and her Rio win made me a believer. Her run in Sacramento just added to the respect I have for Dalilah Muhammed.
 
Day four was exceptional. In the women's 400 meter hurdles, six finishers under 54 seconds, with three under 53 seconds!
Published in Track & Field

by Dave Hunter

June 22, 2017, Sacramento

 

With all due respect to every other event on the track and in the field, isn't there just something special - almost magical - about the 100 meters?

 

The heritage of the 100 meters - the "Century" as it is often referred to by the old-schoolers - is deeply rooted. Our fascination with speed, running speed, goes way back. It is engrained in our culture. From schoolyard squabbles to see who can run the fastest to the quadrennial Olympic finals in the dash, the 100 meters is the battlefield where the argument is finally settled: Who really is the fastest?

 

There is a certain notoriety that accompanies the "Fastest" title. With apologies to the mile, the 100 meters is probably the best known and most embraced track & field event for the expanded population that extends beyond track & field's hardcore fan base. Jesse Owens, Carl Lewis, Usain Bolt - all household names borne from, among other things, 100 meter success.

Published in Track & Field