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Track & Field

Track & Field (366)

Friday, 11 August 2017 17:24

Taylor, Carter lead 4-medal night for Team USATF

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LONDON -- A pair of 1-2 finishes highlighted by a see-saw battle in the men’s triple jump gave Team USATF four medals Thursday evening at Queen Elizabeth Stadium, bringing the total to six golds and 19 medals after seven days of competition.

By Justin Lagat—Kenyans are shifting their 3000m steeplechase dominance to the women's event. In most parts of Kenya, rain is often associated with good luck and blessings. Nothing more could have happened at the ongoing world championships in London to reinforce this believe than what just happened in the women's 3000m steeplechase race in which all the four Kenyan women, in the pouring rain, made it through to the finals. This rain could simply be marking the beginning of Kenya's dominance of the event on the women's side.
 
In a very slow first heat that left the race open up to the last 200m, Kenya's Purity Kirui could not summon enough strength to finish in the first three automatic places when it came down to a sprint for the finish. She finished 4th and her time of 9:40.53 was definitely going to get her into the finals if she was to qualify as one of the fastest losers. However, Colleen Quigley of the US, who had finish in third place, got disqualified and the lucky Kirui managed to get an automatic qualification to replace her. There were two Kenyans in the first heat; Hyvin Kiyeng, the defending champion and Kirui. Kiyeng finished second making it safely to the finals.
 
In the second heat, Kenya's Beatrice Chepkoech and Bahrain's Ruth Jebet opened a big gap on the rest of the field and dominated the race as they both comfortably qualified for the finals. Courtney Frerichs of USA finished in third to join the two as the automatic qualifiers on heat two.
 
By Justin Lagat 
The men's steeple was one of my most anticipated races. It lived up to the hype. Yes, I hoped for Evan Jager to win the gold (as he did), but he battled on, taking bronze, getting first steeple medal for an American male in the World Championships.
 
Conseslus Kipruto single-handedly prevents a potential dethronement of Kenyans in the men's 3000m steeplechase.
 
Just like the East African runners had been seen to be plotting on how to dethrone Mo Farah in the men's 10,000m race for a while now, the rest of the world seem to have as well been, for even a longer time, plotting to beat the Kenyans in their most successful race at the world and Olympic championships; the men's 3000m.
 
With a world leading time by Evan Jager of the US a few weeks to the championships and Morroco's Soufiane El Bakkali having also shown great form by winning two IAAF Diamond League races ahead of the championships, many were rightfully predicting the first win by a non-Kenyan at the world championships since 1987, except if one wants to count out Kenyan-born Saif Shaheen who won the titles in 2003 and 2005 as a non-Kenyan.

RunBlogRun Coverage:
10 Days of London Previews

2017 IAAF World Outdoor Championships
London
Day 8 Preview

1 Men’s 200m - Isaac Makwala came out of quarantine to qualify for the 200m semifinals with a solo run of 20.20 before the main programme commenced and then 20.14 – from lane one – in his semifinal, finishing 0.02 behind Isiah Young.

LONDON -- A 1-3 finish by Phyllis Francis and Allyson Felix, combined with bronze medals from Rio Olympic champions Michelle Carter and Kerron Clementin cold, rainy and breezy conditions, gave Team USATF a four-medal evening and 15 medals thus far at the World Championships Wednesday night at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Stadium.

Wednesday, 09 August 2017 18:52

Video: London 2017 World Championships: Day 6 Preview

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 RunBlogRun Coverage:
10 Days of London Previews

2017 IAAF World Outdoor Championships
London
Day 6 Preview

Wednesday, 09 August 2017 18:17

Kendricks takes PV gold; Jager snares steeple bronze

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LONDON -- Sam Kendrickswent from Olympic silver medalist to World Championships gold medalist Tuesday evening, winning the men’s pole vault at Queen Elizabeth Stadium to close out competition for the night. With a bronze medal from Evan Jagerin the steeplechase - the first medal by an American in that discipline - Team USATF brought its medal tally to 11 through five days of competition.

By Dave Hunter (Aug. 8, 2017; London)
The current confederation of the world's elite men pole vaulters is a highly-competitive, yet strangely collegial group. The legion is an assemblage of ambitious, focused, and talented athletes to be sure. But almost to a man, the top performers also possess an authentic and refreshing team spirit: occasionally engaging in friendly banter and encouraging each other onward to clear higher and higher heights. And on a raw and blustery London night, USA's Sam Kendricks - the fraternity's head cheerleader - strung together a magnificent series of jumps to win the world championship.
 
The weather played a role in the nighttime final. The vaulters could be seen bundling up between jumps to fend off the damp chill. Stocking caps and winter coats were easily spotted within yet another capacity crowd at Olympic Stadium as London's August weather took on a distinctly San Francisco flair.
The men's and women's marathons were held on Day 3 of the 2017 London World Championships. Held on a four loop course near the famous London Tower Bridge, the marathoners had fans the entire way.
 
Amy Cragg took the bronze medal in the marathon, with a gutty finish that required a kick over the last 385 meters. In gaining that medal, something she had discussed with her coach, Jerry Schumacher, who inspired her to focus on the medal and how she could do that, she completed a line with the late Marianne Dickerson, who took the lone other women's marathon medal by an American way back in 1983.
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