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USATF PACIFIC ASSOCIATION — The USATF Pacific Board of Directors nominations are open until Tuesday, 21 March at 10:00pm.

BY LARRY EDER — The Paavo Nurmi 2 mile is one of the highlights of the NYRR Millrose Games. In 2017, it may have been the best race of the meet. A great field, with it all coming down to Andrew Butchart, Mo Ahmed, Ben True and Ryan Hill...
Bob Kennedy was, along with Todd Williams, Mark Croghan, among a few American athletes who battled the best in the world. I was in the Atlanta Stadium and watched Bob Kennedy give the 5000 meters all that he had. The fans and viewers who knew with Kennedy, Williams, Croghan and few others battled the best in the world. We were proud of them, but we would never had dreamed of Rio.
Jordan Hasay is an iconic runner from the Golden State. Countless times during her high school years, she made the pages of California Track & Running News, one of our publications. She was featured in Athletes Only during her college career and as an elite athlete, she has been featured in runblogrun as well. I was in Houston last month when Jordan Hasay ran 68:40 for the half marathon. It was a wonderful race for Jordan Hasay. Coming back from injuries in 2015, short on training in early 2016, Jordan is starting 2017 with a strong statement of fitness. Perhaps fitness and the dedication of her further career to her beloved mother, who she lost in 2016, are part of answer to her fantastic run in Houston. Renewed fitness and extra inspiration are hinting at an exciting 2017. David Hunter's feature puts her last five years in perspective, and her renaissance in 2017.  —Larry Eder
By David Hunter, 1/7/17
 
While arctic temperatures and bone-chilling winds punished most of the country, a select group of elite pole vaulters were heating things up inside the Stiles Athletic Center on the University of Akron campus at the 5th annual Akron Pole Vault Convention.
 
Members of pole vault royalty were in attendance. In the women’s competition, the headliner was Jenn Suhr. The 2012 Olympic vault champion and the indoor world record holder had made the trip down from her upstate New York home to take on a worthy field that included former national champion Mary Saxer and emerging young star Katie Nageotte. 
 
In the men’s event, reigning world champion Shawn Barber and former Zip vault star was looking to make it three Convention wins in a row. Although not competing, retired 2004 Olympic champion and former Olympic record holder Tim Mack was present along with several of his Knoxville vault pupils here to compete and to pick up some technical pointers during the 3-day instructional seminar. Even though she has yet to open her 2017 season, the reigning Olympic champion Katerina Stefanidi and her husband Mitchell Krier, new northeastern Ohio residents, were also in the house.
By David Hunter, 12/15/16
 
When older followers of track & field first think of Dwight Stones, they often recall “the rookie” - the brash young high jumper who embraced the revolutionary Fosbury Flop, was the youngest member the 1972 USA Olympic track & field squad, captured the bronze medal in Munich, and went on to author a truly outstanding high jump career. Yet younger fans see Stones in a different way: as a passionate, informed track & field commentator who does his homework and has earned respect as a true professional from all corners of the sport. Both assessments are right on target.
 
Raised in Southern California, Stones was at the vanguard of the first wave of athletes to tackle the vertical jump as it was undergoing an event-changing transition. “I pretty much showed up when the event was at the very early transitioning point in the high jump with Dick's [’68 gold medalist Fosbury] success in Mexico City,” offers the two-time Olympic bronze medalist. “A lot of athletes who had no business were trying to switch to the flop. They weren’t built for it. They tried to switch to it without much success. There were other guys who probably should have, but didn’t.” 
Thursday, 22 December 2016 17:03

Vin Lananna Takes Reins at USATF

By Elliott Denman
 
ORLANDO, FL – Vin Lananna, incoming president-elect of USA Track and Field, promises that “my action will match my words.”
 
At a moment in the sport’s history when optimism is often in short supply, Lananna’s emergence as the sport’s number one guy in the nation that continues to boast its national team is the number one in the world – Exhibit A, those 32 Rio medals - is very welcome news. He’s the right man in the right spot at the right time.
 
When the great Jackie Joyner-Kersee withdrew from the presidential race to succeed Stephanie Hightower, whose term limits were up, the position became Lananna’s by default. There would be no further need to continue the electioneering process taking place at the USATF Annual Meeting going on in the Orlando Hilton Hotel. The scheduled “Vote For Vin” reception instead became a victory celebration. Its reason no longer apropos, some of the would-be voting delegates simply wandered off to a nearby North Carolina Association promoting its candicacy to host the National Junior Olympics.
Back in the late-70s when Lance Harter began his collegiate coaching career, he was wise enough to observe and listen to older, more experienced track & field coaches knowing he could pick up valuable pointers from them.  “When I was getting started, I was the young buck at the Cal Poly SLO. And everybody would call me “kid’ or ‘son’”, laughs Harter.  ”I’m very blessed that I’ve had the opportunities that I’ve had.  And I attribute a lot of it to the mentors that I’ve had. I was very fortunate to have mentors that said, ‘You’re the young buck. But let’s do it the right way.’ And I’m very appreciative of that.” Now the roles are reversed as Harter – one of the most respected and decorated college track& field coaches in the game – is the one from whom advice is sought.  
 
After a several year stint as a successful high school coach in Colorado, Harter grabbed the opportunity to move up to the collegiate coaching level when he was appointed as the women’s cross country and track & field coach at Cal Poly SLO. During his 11 years at San Luis Obispo, Harter wore many hats: coaching, teaching, and honing his fundraising skills for the under-funded program. Through it all, he thrived. “I loved it there. I loved the program. I loved the whole idea of Division II, developing kids,” adds Harter with enthusiasm. “After 14 national championships, I wondered if I could do it again at the next level.” 
Wednesday, 14 December 2016 00:37

Ryan Crouser: Is The Best Yet To Come?

Nov. 27, 2016 
By Dave Hunter
 
A favorite, accurate, and often-used sports saying declares, “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” So true.  Ah, but when talent does work hard you have, well, Ryan Crouser – a young, gifted, and dedicated athlete who’s the reigning Olympic gold medalist and Olympic record-holder in the shot put.
 
Few look askance when – in the months that follow the Olympic Games – newly-crowned gold medalists take a break from training to rest, recuperate, and savor their winning performance. But when we recently caught up with Ryan Crouser, the 6’ 7” 290-pound Olympic champion wasn’t chilling. He was logging time at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, California working to build strength and gain some quality weight in preparation for the upcoming world championship year.  
From USATF (Nov. 11, 2016) -- In a sea of over 51,000 runners at last Sunday’s TCS New York City Marathon, 2016 Olympian Molly Huddle (Providence, Rhode Island) pushed through to finish her debut marathon in third-place, running the sixth-fastest American woman’s NYC Marathon debut in history. 
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